Ramandeep, BA Land Economy

Having been born and brought up in New Delhi, India – a country with a long, shared history with the UK – the prospect of studying at the University of Cambridge was a source of unbridled excitement for me. To confess, there were the initial doubts and misconceptions (Is Cambridge accepting of international students? Would there be any discrimination?); however, these notions quickly crumbled when I first attended a Cambridge Open Day. I was convinced that Cambridge was where I wanted to study, and it was clear that Trinity Hall would be the ideal community.

Trinity Hall lacks a sense of pretence, harbours warm feelings of family, and appreciates its magnificent history

Each Cambridge college has its own character – each is a community in itself that is much more than just the architectural form that it takes. For me, the beauty of Trinity Hall lies in its small community, which is perhaps the friendliest and most inclusive in Cambridge. Trinity Hall lacks a sense of pretence, harbours warm feelings of family, and appreciates its magnificent history (the College is almost 700 years old!) – attributes that give the College a sense of vitality, youth and progressive outlook. As a bonus to its friendly staff and warm-hearted students, Trinity Hall has beautiful courtyards, rich gardens and old Elizabethan buildings – all of which add to the pride of studying at one of the world’s oldest universities.

having lived in a developing country before coming to Cambridge, I recognised the vital role that economics and law could play in the process of shaping socio-economic development.

While the thought of choosing the subject that I wanted to read at Cambridge seemed an intimidating task at first, the study of Land Economy caught my attention almost immediately (perhaps because of its intriguing name!). The multi-disciplinary study of Economics, Law, and Environment was an instant attraction for me; having lived in a developing country before coming to Cambridge, I recognised the vital role that economics and law could play in the process of shaping socio-economic development. As a student of the subject, I am kept engaged by the varied course material, the focus on inter-disciplinary linkages, and the core skills that the subject helps to develop. Being one of around 50 first-year students, the subject offers a great way to meet people from different backgrounds and develop life-long relationships.

As a student at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, I can assure you that although the thought of studying your subject alongside some of the smartest students in the world may seem daunting at first, the experience is incomparable. The friendly atmosphere of collegiate life, coupled with the relationships that I have formed with students and staff, have made my time at Cambridge truly memorable so far.

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