Asymptomatic Testing

What is it?

A major component of the Collegiate University’s strategy for community risk management is the asymptomatic testing programme to be adopted weekly in all Colleges for Michaelmas term. The programme consists of the testing of all students in College accommodation on a weekly pooled basis (via a self-administered nose and throat swab) and then rapid individual testing where a pooled sample contains one or more positive results. In this way we maximise the number of tests that can be performed across the Collegiate University without compromising available capacity across the NHS. Your participation in this programme is a major contribution to individual and community risk management.

Information on testing during Lent Term 2021

How will it work?

The delivery and administration of testing is being conducted by University staff and clinicians. Within each College, students will be responsible for collecting tests from pigeon holes on a designated day each week by 8am (one lead student to be nominated per testing group) and for returning them to the Porters’ Lodge by midday on the same day. The tests are then collected and students will be notified by text of their pooled results the following day. Where a pool contains one or more positive samples that pool will be retested the following day on an individual basis at a University testing centre and again results will be notified by text within 24 hours.

How are test pools allocated?

These will generally be allocated by households but small households may be aggregated into one group to maximise testing capacity (ideal group size is 8). Each group is asked to nominate a leader (and preferably a deputy in case the leader is diagnosed positive). The leader will be responsible for collecting the tests, ensuring everyone participates and returning them to the Porters Lodge.

Who are the College staff leads?

Andrew Keenan, Head Porter

Jo Rhodes, College Nurse

Rosie Ince, Tutorial Registrar

Self-isolation

Where a pooled test gives one or more positive readings then that group will be required to self-isolate between receiving the results of the first and second tests (except for taking the second test). If a household of students all receive a negative reading for the second test they no longer need to self-isolate. If a household member receives a positive result, then every member of the household will be required to self-isolate for 10 days. Those who test positive will not be required to participate in the testing programme for the rest of Michaelmas term.

Where can I find more information/answers to questions?

Find out more about asymptomatic testing on the University website.

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